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baking therapy

While speaking to another person about my cooking and baking experiences, I realized that I had acquired more than just skills along the way, but had also developed tried-and-true tips.

This got me thinking about the many opportunities that I have had to learn along the way.  However, today’s prompt gave me a way to share some of those ideas.

When cleaning mushrooms, place in a shallow bowl and sprinkle flour over the surface of them.  Let them sit for a few minutes.  Then, wash the surface of the mushroom gently with either your fingertips (if you prefer more tactile cooking) or a very soft baby toothbrush.  The flour gives the dirt something to grab onto and helps to rinse away more of it before using in soups or salads.

To measure thick liquid items, like syrup or honey, lightly grease a dry measuring cup (the kind you would use for flour or sugar).  You can use a light spray of a vegetable coating product like Pam.  Or, if you don’t want to use an aerosol or prefer less chemicals, lightly coat a folded paper towel with canola oil and wipe along the inside of the measuring cup.  This will keep the tacky substance from sticking to the measuring cup and will pour easily into your mixing bowl.

Image result for measuring glasses

Many recipes call for vegetable shortening or butter and state specific measurements.  To get a most accurate measurement, rather than spooning tablespoons into a dry measuring cup and mashing to fill it, an easy way to get the right amount is by using a large glass measuring cup and water.  If your recipe calls for one cup of butter, you can use a 2-cup or 4-cup measuring glass (Pyrex and Anchor Hocking make great ones).  Use a clear glass liquid measuring cup so you can easily see the line markings.  If you are using a 2-cup liquid measure, place one cup of cool or room temperature water into the measuring glass.  If the water is warm or hot, it will begin to melt the shortening.  As you spoon your butter into the measuring glass, the water level on the markings will begin to rise.  When the water level rises from the one-cup measure line to the two-cup measuring line, the amount of solid used is the equivalent of one cup.  This easy mini science lesson is called “solid displacement.”  If baking with children, it is a great teaching moment.  Pour off the water carefully and tip your chunks of butter into a mixing bowl.

What great ideas have you learned and incorporated along the way when you create something special in your kitchen?

wooden spoons

Please share!

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https://dailypost.wordpress.com/prompts/funnel/

Thank you for stopping by.  I hope that you enjoy your visit.  You are most welcome here.

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